Shrinking

By Barbara Diggs
Nia didn’t mind at first. Being at her kids’ eye-level made life easier. Their odd stories and complaints became miraculously comprehensible.

Uncle John Isn’t Really My Uncle

By Leslie Walker Trahan
He’s just a man who works at the candy company. When he visits, he brings me and Mom bags of malformed candies, the ones that weren’t good enough to package.

Fading

By Sarita Sidhu
My parents are fading. As did theirs. My father’s unyielding certitude has been momentarily displaced by bewilderment, betraying a loss of relevance in a new world order.

Honey

By Bailey Bridgewater
There are bees trapped into the walls of an abandoned home. There are ghosts trapped in the attic, swaying to their hum.

A Tiger on the Rue du Bac

By Elizabeth Kuelbs
Savannah sneaks out of the hotel while her dad and Veronica rest up for more museums of naked cherubs and armless statues.

All White Male Authors Look Alike

By Ran Walker
She bought him a book by John Barth as a birthday gift. “You like him, don’t you?” she asked.

Child Play

By Kendall Brunson
His daughters ran from the back of the yard screaming “Snake! Snake!” The poisonous water moccasin slithered after his children, but his wife was the first to react.

Photo Story: School Fair

By Katherine Hubbard
Nina’s four, I’m seven. At the penny-toss Nina wins a goldfish with silvery fins–everyone cheers. I toss all my pennies, win nothing.

Photo Story: Picturesque

By Mason Frost
“We have reservations at Gabriel’s tonight,” she said, toweling her hair. “James?”

The Uncle

By Ron Hartley
I used to love to linger and breathe in the scent of our cluttered garage, and of dad’s old pick-up always parked there.

Photo Story: The Little Ones

By Elijah Lee Gunn
They burrow between the cracks in our reality, craving the taste of clouds, feeling only the coarse, rough dirt below.

Building the Butternut

By Alisa Golden
It didn't seem right, but we set the clocks and got the children up at midnight to go out and yell at the squash.